How will Brexit affect the future of travel?

As you probably already know, Britain has voted to leave the EU. Aside from the many different views and opinions on this controversial topic, we would like to talk about how this has, and could, affect the future of travel.

After the final results of the referendum, there are a few common questions many of the general public have about the future of travel, such as:

  • Will  the price of holidays increase?
  • Will I need a new passport / driving license after we leave the EU?
  • Will I require a visa to travel European countries?
  • What happens to my European Health Insurance Card (EHIC)?

As with almost everything related to the decision to leave the EU, it is not clear how things will proceed and it is still unclear exactly what sort of relationship Britain will be able to strike with the European Union. And so, therefore, it is uncertain as to what will actually happen regarding travel to the EU.

What we do know is that:

  • There are no immediate changes to claiming compensation if your flight is delayed or cancelled.
  • You can still bring home unlimited goods from duty free.
  • There are no immediate changes to using your phone abroad.
  • You can still use your European Health Insurance Card card abroad.
  • It is likely that British Citizens will (at some point) need brand new passports as the front cover currently features the words “European Union”.
  • It is also likely that we will (at some point) need brand new driving licenses as this has the European flag featured on it.

The UK Government will need to implement new laws for each of the above after we leave the EU. The only immediate impact to travel could be from the value of the pound.

ABTA has released this statement on the result of the EU Referendum –

The Prime Minister has stated that there will be no initial change in the way people travel. Travellers are as free to move between the UK and the EU as they were yesterday, European Health Insurance cards remain valid and regulations such as Air Passenger Rights remain in place. People due to travel this summer will see little changes to their holiday.

Once the UK formally notifies the EU of its intention to leave, the remaining Member States will have up to two years to offer the UK a deal for a future trading relationship and during this period holidaymakers will not see any immediate changes.

However, the fall in value of the pound will have an immediate impact on holidaymakers and their spending power overseas.

ABTA is the UK’s largest travel association, representing travel agents and tour operators.

For further queries or questions, you can visit ABTA’s FAQ page of their website here.

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