How will Brexit affect the future of travel?

As you probably already know, Britain has voted to leave the EU. Aside from the many different views and opinions on this controversial topic, we would like to talk about how this has, and could, affect the future of travel.

After the final results of the referendum, there are a few common questions many of the general public have about the future of travel, such as:

  • Will  the price of holidays increase?
  • Will I need a new passport / driving license after we leave the EU?
  • Will I require a visa to travel European countries?
  • What happens to my European Health Insurance Card (EHIC)?

As with almost everything related to the decision to leave the EU, it is not clear how things will proceed and it is still unclear exactly what sort of relationship Britain will be able to strike with the European Union. And so, therefore, it is uncertain as to what will actually happen regarding travel to the EU.

What we do know is that:

  • There are no immediate changes to claiming compensation if your flight is delayed or cancelled.
  • You can still bring home unlimited goods from duty free.
  • There are no immediate changes to using your phone abroad.
  • You can still use your European Health Insurance Card card abroad.
  • It is likely that British Citizens will (at some point) need brand new passports as the front cover currently features the words “European Union”.
  • It is also likely that we will (at some point) need brand new driving licenses as this has the European flag featured on it.

The UK Government will need to implement new laws for each of the above after we leave the EU. The only immediate impact to travel could be from the value of the pound.

ABTA has released this statement on the result of the EU Referendum –

The Prime Minister has stated that there will be no initial change in the way people travel. Travellers are as free to move between the UK and the EU as they were yesterday, European Health Insurance cards remain valid and regulations such as Air Passenger Rights remain in place. People due to travel this summer will see little changes to their holiday.

Once the UK formally notifies the EU of its intention to leave, the remaining Member States will have up to two years to offer the UK a deal for a future trading relationship and during this period holidaymakers will not see any immediate changes.

However, the fall in value of the pound will have an immediate impact on holidaymakers and their spending power overseas.

ABTA is the UK’s largest travel association, representing travel agents and tour operators.

For further queries or questions, you can visit ABTA’s FAQ page of their website here.

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Rio 2016 Travel Requirements

British Citizen Passport Holders

For British Nationals, travel to Brazil does not require a visa. However:

  • You will need to comply with Brazilian immigration laws on arrival in the country.
  • You must satisfy the Federal Police (the Brazilian immigration authority) of your intended purpose of visit.
  • You will need to show that you have enough money for the duration of your stay.
  • Provide details of your accommodation and evidence of return or further onward travel.
  • Your passport should be stamped. If it is not, you may be fined on departure. Keep your immigration landing card. You will need it when you leave. If you lose it you may also be fined.
  • Your passport should be valid for a minimum period of 6 months from the date of entry into Brazil.

Information from www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/brazil/entry-requirements.gov.uk

The British Government have also released a useful guide to help you ‘stay ahead of the games’. It gives you advices and information about travel insurance, when is best to book, vaccinations, languages and more! You can download it here.


Other Nationalities

It comes as no surprise that the Rio Olympics are going to bring in a huge amount of foreign visitors, and so, the Brazilian Government are making it as easy (and as safe) as possible for travellers to enter Brazil. That is why they have introduced a temporary Visa Waiver Program (until the 18th of September 2016).

Australian, Canadian, Japanese and US nationals will not require a tourist visa to enter Brazil. Instead, they will be eligible for a 90 day, non-extendable, visa waiver.

*Note: you do not have to be attending the Olympic Games to take advantage of the new travel requirements.

If you want to check visa requirements of any other nationalities then, you can download this document (Entry Visas To Brazil PDF).

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Get to know your Visas

We all know that, when travelling, different countries have different visa requirements. For example, travel to Turkey may require you to obtain an e-visa whereas travel to America could see you needing an ESTA and some countries only needing a visa on arrival or not needing a visa at all… but what is the difference? and what types of visa are out there?

Common types of visa

Alongside the standard full visas for tourist and business purposes, here are some of the other common types of visa that travellers may need:

ESTA

An ESTA is an Electronic System for Travel Authorisation. This is required for travel in to the USA if you are a citizen of a country that is a part of The Visa Waiver Program.

Applying for an ESTA only determines your eligibility for entry into America.

The US use the ESTA in place of a visa (for citizens of certain countries) and is electronically applied to your e-passport.

*Please note: There are many different types of visa that can be applied for when travelling to America, from an A visa all the way to a WT visa, depending on your purpose of travel and eligibility. 

e-Visa

An e-Visa grants authorisation to enter the particular country you have applied for. It has the same effect as a normal visa but is applied electronically. This kind of visa is applied and paid for online. e-Visas are available for varied validities dependant on the issuing country (from 30 to 90 days). If you do not qualify for an e-Visa you will need to apply for a full visa.

Countries that use the e-visa scheme are as listed below:

eTA

An eTA is an “Electronic Tourist Authorisation” which, as you guessed, authorises tourists to enter certain countries when travelling. The can also be referred to as an “Electronic Tourist Authority”. They are applied to your passport electronically and so leaves out the need for any physical documentation to be submitted for the application.

In some instances you may need to obtain an eTA even if you are transiting through that specific country. Also, the duration of the eTA can vary – for example, a Canadian eTA can last for 5 years.

Countries that use the eTA scheme are as listed below:

Transit Visa

This type of visa is valid for travellers who do not wish to stay in the country, but only to pass through it. The visa is temporary and only valid for a short period of time. Some countries require that you have a stop over of  24 hours minimum to grant you a transit visa. But, others provide a transit visa for a stop over as small as 4 hours.


If you have any questions or queries about your visa, or you want to apply for one, please call our award winning team on 01270 250 590 or visit our website: thetravelvisacompany.co.uk

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